Key Learning Principles at Imaginary College

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The purpose of the learning module is to review key aspects of learning theory which serve as a foundation of teaching and learning at an imaginary post-secondary institution, which provides second language programs.
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Introduction

Welcome to my Final Capstone for 3444 Theory and Science of Learning!  The aim of this learning module is help new teachers review key learning principles as a means of understanding the teaching philosophy at Imaginary College.  

At Imaginary College, we focus on providing excellent second language programs for international university students.

By the end of the module, you will be able to 

  • understand scaffolding in the context of language education
  • review student strategies for learning discrete language deliverables 
  • apply motivation principles to encourage student engagement 

 

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Overview of the ADDIE model

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The ADDIE model

In this lesson, you will

  1. Learn about the ADDIE model and its stages
  2. Explore the benefits and drawbacks of the ADDIE model

 

What is the ADDIE model?

ADDIE is an acronym for the framework that guides the course development process.  Watch the following video on the ADDIE model to find out more.  Then complete the matching exercise below which describes each ADDIE stage.

 

Addie Model animation from Don Lowing on Vimeo.

Why use the ADDIE model?

The purpose of the ADDIE model is to provide a framework to support the course development process.  Clearly defined stages guide course developers along the course development journey.  The model is simple and easy to remember.  It has been employed for decades and is an established and accepted foundation for instructional design.  Historically, it has been associated with design quality. 

The nice thing about ADDIE is it can be used in all types of projects, such as a learning intervention for AODA compliance in customer service or a training module on surgical devices for medical professionals.  Furthermore, this model aids in project management and doesn't require special training in project management techniques.

ADDIE also provides a holistic framework, which considers the relationships between stages rather than a series of self-contained sequential steps four course development.  What was done in previous stages impacts subsequent stages.  With that being said, the model also facilitates continuous course improvement and can be used to create prototypes. 

There are several tools that accompany the stages of ADDIE.  For example, templates for lesson plans can be helpful in the Design and Development stages.

 

Now that you can identify the stages of the ADDIE model and the model's advantages and disadvantages, we can examine the Design stage in more detail!  

Next lesson: Design in course development

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This provides a brief overview of the ADDIE model in order to provide context for the Design stage (2nd step) within the model.

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ADDIE course development: The Design stage

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This interactive learning module covers the design stage in the course development framework.
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Introduction

Welcome to my Final Project for the Foundations of Instructional Design course!

The purpose of this learning module is provide you with an overview of the ADDIE model and a detailed look at the second stage of this model: Design.

By the end of this module you will be able to:

  • Identify the benefits and drawbacks of the ADDIE model
  • Highlight key aspects of the design stage within real-world examples
  • Apply tools and strategies which will help with design

 

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Remix of Guide to Planning and Designing an Online Learning Experience

Content Blocks

1. Learning objectives

Start with defining your "why".

  • What are your learning objectives?
  • What learning experience are you trying to solve?
  • What do you want to teach people?

2. Challenges

Next, identify the challenges your learners currently face in order to reach the learning objective(s) you just defined.

  • What is keeping them from being able to learn what you're hoping to teach them?
  • What are some learning gaps?
  • What are some non-learning gaps?

3. Content (Building Blocks)

Now it's time to start thinking about content.

It's easier to brainstorm all the content in terms of building blocks:

  • What are the "steps" that will form the journey to get the learner from Point A to Point B?
  • What does the learning experience need to consist of, in order to fulfill the learning objective?

4. Sequence

Like a puzzle, the content building blocks of the learning experience should "fit" together well. 

  • Will you incorporate spaced learning?
  • Do you have a progressive case study approach?
  • What's the starting point and what's the end-point for what you will teach?

Now try structuring and organizing the content you've planned. Organize the blocks in a sequence that fits the asynchronous and/or synchronous nature of your lesson/course/module.

5. Learning Activities

Especially in an online setting, the sequenced content you've planned should be matched with appropriate learning activities.

Think about all the different ways your learners can absorb the information.

  • How will they interact with the different concepts and skills?
  • How will they apply and practice new knowledge?

Examples of interaction formats for learning activities may include: audio, video, text, discussions, quizzes, critique sessions, lectures, projects, demos, etc.

6. Sensory

Great! Now that you've thought about: learning objectives, possible challenges faced by learners, content, sequencing/rhythm, and learning activities... 

It's time to take a step back and reflect on the sensory aspect of the learning experience. Sure, it's an online learning experience — but that doesn't mean it can't include offline, asynchronous formats or other ideas to take learning beyond the screen.

What are some words to describe how you want the learning experience to look and feel like for your learners?

Reflections from start to finish

A Japanese, slow-food "kaiseki" approach to designing educational experiences:

From start to finish, our goal is to craft a meaningful sequence of learning events that will give our students the taste, texture, appearance & colors of new and relevant knowledge.

A kaiseki approach to multimodal learning: many different courses representing different learning activities to form the whole learning journey

A Japanese slow-food approach to multimodal online learning

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6 steps to help guide educators' reflections around planning and designing an online learning experience.

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Guide to Planning and Designing an Online Learning Experience

Content Blocks

1. Learning objectives

Start with defining your "why".

  • What are your learning objectives?
  • What learning experience are you trying to solve?
  • What do you want to teach people?

2. Challenges

Next, identify the challenges your learners currently face in order to reach the learning objective(s) you just defined.

  • What is keeping them from being able to learn what you're hoping to teach them?
  • What are some learning gaps?
  • What are some non-learning gaps?

3. Content (Building Blocks)

Now it's time to start thinking about content.

It's easier to brainstorm all the content in terms of building blocks:

  • What are the "steps" that will form the journey to get the learner from Point A to Point B?
  • What does the learning experience need to consist of, in order to fulfill the learning objective?

4. Sequence

Like a puzzle, the content building blocks of the learning experience should "fit" together well. 

  • Will you incorporate spaced learning?
  • Do you have a progressive case study approach?
  • What's the starting point and what's the end-point for what you will teach?

Now try structuring and organizing the content you've planned. Organize the blocks in a sequence that fits the asynchronous and/or synchronous nature of your lesson/course/module.

5. Learning Activities

Especially in an online setting, the sequenced content you've planned should be matched with appropriate learning activities.

Think about all the different ways your learners can absorb the information.

  • How will they interact with the different concepts and skills?
  • How will they apply and practice new knowledge?

Examples of interaction formats for learning activities may include: audio, video, text, discussions, quizzes, critique sessions, lectures, projects, demos, etc.

6. Sensory

Great! Now that you've thought about: learning objectives, possible challenges faced by learners, content, sequencing/rhythm, and learning activities... 

It's time to take a step back and reflect on the sensory aspect of the learning experience. Sure, it's an online learning experience — but that doesn't mean it can't include offline, asynchronous formats or other ideas to take learning beyond the screen.

What are some words to describe how you want the learning experience to look and feel like for your learners?

Reflections from start to finish

A Japanese, slow-food "kaiseki" approach to designing educational experiences:

From start to finish, our goal is to craft a meaningful sequence of learning events that will give our students the taste, texture, appearance & colors of new and relevant knowledge.

A kaiseki approach to multimodal learning: many different courses representing different learning activities to form the whole learning journey

A Japanese slow-food approach to multimodal online learning

Cover Image
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6 steps to help guide educators' reflections around planning and designing an online learning experience.

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